Personalization: Friend or Foe?

Hong Kong iStockalypse.  An Asian tailor checks the fit of a custom made outfit for a woman customer in Kowloon, Hong Kong.  The partially handmade vest has been hand basted and will be completed when final adjustments have been made.

Is giving your consumers too many options, or too many choices, hurting your company or brand? This week we dive into how personalization and customization can be a hero or a detriment – and why sometimes less is more for your consumers overall experience.

Even Spotify Is Surprised by the Huge Success of Its Discover Weekly Playlists, Adweek

When you provide users with an option to listen to nearly every artist under the sun (minus Taylor Swift and a few others) there is an amazing feeling of endless possibilities. However, once you exhaust your favorites…what do you do? Well, Spotify clearly thought about this and launched the Discover page – a place where users could go to find new or related music they’d like. However, the adoption of this page was low.

“It was a bit like going to the record store and having to go through all the shelves to find the good stuff,” Ogle said.

Next came the Discover Weekly playlist – a customized, algorithm based, playlist that gives each user 30 songs they might like based on their tastes. By providing a small playlist – in one quick and easy to access spot – Spotify provided the personalization users needed without the daunting task of sorting through hundreds or thousands of songs.

Why Too Much Personalization Can Be a Problem for Brands, AdAge

In this article Jason Burby discusses and explores how the growing desire for personalized experiences by consumers puts some companies in an interesting place where sacrifices may need to be made. His focus on “the personalization triangle” puts these choices in an interesting light – and definitely something worth all brands and companies trying to understand.

“In the personalization triangle, you either individualize the experience, provide a good experience overall, or have low costs.”


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *